January 2012 Newsletter from
"This Day in North American Indian History"
by Phil Konstantin
Copyright © © Phil Konstantin (1996-2013)

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> Phil Konstantin's January 2012 Newsletter
> =============================================
>
> Greetings,
>
> It has been a difficult period trying to deal with the new computer I
> bought back in July. Starting in September, it spent over two months in
> the Gateway repair shop in Texas. I had to return it FIVE time, and get
> it back with more troubles for SIXTH time before Gateway finally decided
> to give e a new one. I have a Gateway FX6860 (really made by Acer). When
> it works, it is a good, fast computer. When it didn't work, it was a
> real pain. All of the people I dealt with who worked directly for
> Gateway were polite and as helpful as they could be. However, Gateway
> has some very strange ways of doing things. I'd
> really think twice about getting a Gateway, if I were you. I finally got
> the replacement computer in mid December. This is why there has been no
> newsletters for so long.
>
> Two days ago, I watched the DVD version of the movie "Reel Injun: On the
> Trail of the Hollywood Indian". I love movies, and this was a very
> interesting look at how Indians have been depicted and used in films,
> primarily those made in Hollywood. The docmentary is by a First Nation
> man from Canada. He has an interesting perspective on the issue. You can
> get a copy through Netflicks or through their website:
>
> http://www.reelinjunthemovie.com/site/
>
>
>
> I have been playing around with some new software which came with my
> computer (while my computer is still working). Because of this, I have
> been uploading short videos to YouTube. Many of these are just old,
> family things. However, a few are American Indian related. There are
> some scenes at Chaco Canyon, The Grand Falls of the Little Colorado
> River on the Navajo Reservation, and a look at the Washita Battlesite in
> Oklahoma. You can visit "my channel" on YouTube here:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/user/cherokeephil
>
>
>
> Phil
>
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>
>
> LINKS OF THE MONTH - JANUARY 2012
> -----------------------------------
>
> Hopi Petroglyph Sites - A Slideshow Introduction of Tutuveni and Dawa
> Park
>
> A nicely designed website with lots od information and photos at:
>
> http://archive.cyark.org/hopi-petroglyph-sites-intro
>
> From ther website:
> Tutuveni is an important site along the Hopi pilgrimage route to
> Ongtuvqa, also known as the Grand Canyon. The site lies west of the Hopi
> Reservation in Arizona, and within the neighboring Navajo Nation.
> Meaning Newspaper Rock in Hopi, Tutuveni contains 5,000 petroglyphs of
> Hopi clan symbols and is the largest known collection of clan symbols in
> the American Southwest. Among Tutuveni's 150 sandstone boulders are the
> records of more than 1,000 years of Hopi history and culture.
>
>
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>
>
> TREATY OF THE MONTH
> -----------------------
>
> TREATY WITH THE FLORIDA TRIBES OF INDIANS, 1823.
>
> Sept. 18, 1823. | 7 Stat., 224. | Proclamation, Jan. 2, 1824.
>
> http://digital.library.okstate.edu/kappler/Vol2/treaties/sem0203.htm
>
>
> Some of the provisions of this treaty:
> Said Indians to continue under the protection of United States.
> Said Indians to be confined to the following metes and bounds.
> United States to take the Florida Indians under their care, etc.
> United States to guaranty peaceable possession of the district assigned
> them, on certain conditions.
> Corn, meat, etc., to be allowed them for twelve months.
> An agent, etc., to be appointed to reside among them.
> Indians to prevent any fugitive slaves from taking shelter among them,
> etc.
>
>
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>
>
> Anouncements:
> (Posted strictly for informational purposes. Unless noted, I do not
> vouvh for these people or groups.)
>
> -------------
>
> Human Trafficking Petition: South Dakota’s stolen children | Change.org
> https://www.change.org/petitions/south-dakotas-stolen-children
>
>
>
>
> ========================
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>
>
> News Articles (in no particular order):
> -------------------------------------
>
>
> National Native News Report (radio)
> http://www.nativenews.net/listen/nnn.mp3
>
> Overview of the Verde Sinagua riches
> http://verdenews.com/main.asp?SectionID=74&SubsectionID=114&ArticleID=45462
>
>
> Wild, Wild West
> http://www.mohawknationnews.com/wordpress/2011/12/29/mnn-wild-wild-west/
>
> The 2011 Hall of Fame and Mantle of Shame
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/02/70245-70245
>
> Robert Coulter: Tribes take the lead on UN rights declaration
> http://64.38.12.138/News/2011/004072.asp
>
> FCC adopts Native American radio proposal
> http://www.rbr.com/radio/fcc-adopts-native-american-radio-proposal.html
>
> Navajo Nation seeks return of exhumed remains
> http://nativetimes.com/life/culture/6555-navajo-nation-seeks-return-of-exhumed-remains?utm_source=Southwestern+Archaeology+Today&utm_campaign=c5d7b68d69-SAT+Weekly+Broadcast&utm_medium=email
>
>
> Agave – A Very Useful Resource for the Ancient People of the Southwest
> http://tucsoncitizen.com/wryheat/2011/12/21/agave-a-plant-of-many-uses/
>
> Sky is Not Falling
> http://www.mohawknationnews.com/wordpress/2012/01/
>
> The Darkside of the Dome: ‘The American Dominate’
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ict_sbc/70256
>
> Tribe heads in wrong direction with disenrollment
> http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/sns-201112141730--tms--rkoehlerctnbk-a20111215dec15,0,4933250.column
>
>
> Councilor raises concerns with non-Cherokee hires
> http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Article/Index/5817
>
> FEMA supports allowing tribes to ask for aid
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6504-fema-supports-allowing-tribes-to-ask-for-aid
>
>
> The Difference Between Western Prophecies And Native American Prophecies
> http://www.yraceburu.org/122811B.html
>
> Status Indians Could Legally be Extinct in 75 years
> http://www.nativevillage.org/Archives/2011%20Archives/DEC%202011%20News/Status%20Indians%20Could%20Legally%20be%20Extinct%20in%2075%20Years.htm
>
>
> In Defense of Native 8(a) Programs
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ict_sbc/in-defense-of-native-8a-programs
>
>
> Ashaninka people face threats to their way of life
> http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/12/the-ashaninka-a-threatened-way-of-life/100208/
>
>
> Language specialists racing to save Cherokee language
> http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Article/Index/5815
>
> Obama: Relations with tribes at turning point
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6490-obama-relations-with-tribes-at-turning-point
>
>
> Locked Down: Protest halts destruction on San Francisco Peaks
> http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/06/locked-down-protest-halts-snowbowl.html
>
>
> Tribe attempts to evict private military contractor
> http://www.sdcitybeat.com/sandiego/article-9584-tribe-attempts-to-evict-private-military-contractor-los-coyotes-band-in-a-legal-standoff-with-blackwater-tied-company.html
>
>
> Confronting the Past on the Anniversary of the Massacre at Wounded Knee:
> Why It Matters
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ict_sbc/confronting-the-past-on-the-anniversary-of-the-massacre-at-wounded-knee-why-it-matters
>
>
> Mohawk people can control our own
> http://64.38.12.138/News/2011/003987.asp
>
> American Indian Twins Born in Old & New Year
> http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/american-indian-twins-born-in-old-new-year.html
>
>
> Interior names members of Indian trust commission
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6465-interior-names-members-of-indian-trust-commission
>
>
> Lakotas to Diane Sawyer: Let Lakotas tell their story Updated with video
> from Lakota teens: ‘We are more than that’
> http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/10/lakotas-to-diane-sawyer-let-lakotas.html
>
>
> FWP approves bison relocation to 2 reservations
> http://www.reznetnews.org/article/fwp-approves-bison-relocation-2-reservations
>
>
> The Inuit in 2011: A Snapshot and Retrospective
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/02/the-inuit-in-2011-a-snapshot-and-retrospective-70315
>
>
> Canada to propose changes to First Nation election rules
> http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2011/12/06/duncan-expected-to-unveil-band-electoral-reform-bill-to-set-new-term-limits-impose-penalties-for-rule-breaking/
>
>
> The Commercialization of Native Spirituality
> http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/the-commercialization-of-native-spirituality.html
>
>
> BIA announces leasing reform for Indian Country
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6443-bia-announces-leasing-reform-for-indian-country
>
>
> Guiding through the maze
> http://www.reznetnews.org/article/guiding-through-maze
>
> The Washington Post: Indians ‘Have Waited Too Long for Justice’ over
> Redskins’ Name
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/02/the-washington-post-70307
>
>
> Attawapiskat First Nation put under third-party management
> http://64.38.12.138/News/2011/003923.asp
>
> The Spreading of a Truth
> http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/2011-the-spreading-of-a-truth.html
>
> Obama holds third Native American conference
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6441-obama-to-hold-third-native-american-conference
>
>
> SD court upholds dismissal of school abuse lawsuit
> http://www.reznetnews.org/article/sd-court-upholds-dismissal-school-abuse-lawsuit
>
>
> ‘Passing Narwhal’ Photo Wins Award
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/02/passing-narwhal-photo-wins-award-70294
>
>
> Protecting Native American women from violence is an uphill battle
> http://www.calbarjournal.com/December2011/TopHeadlines/TH1.aspx
>
> First American Indian Woman Dean of Law School Named
> http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/first-american-indian-woman-dean-of-law-school-named.html
>
>
> NCAI: Congress deals setback to tribal justice
> http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/6416-ncai-congress-deals-setback-to-tribal-justice
>
>
> Yankton Sioux Student First in Tribe to Earn a Physics Degree
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/02/yankton-sioux-student-first-in-tribe-to-earn-a-physics-degree-69276
>
>
> GO RUN trains Native women to run for public office
> http://thecirclenews.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=619&Itemid=62
>
>
> Little Shell leaders say new election likely
> http://nativetimes.com/news/tribal/6527-little-shell-leaders-say-new-election-likely
>
>
> Preparing for Next Pow Wow Season: A Field Guide
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/photogallery/preparing-for-next-pow-wow-season-a-field-guide
>
>
> Report tells stories of Native victims of prostitution sex trafficking
> http://thecirclenews.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=618&Itemid=63
>
>
> Cherokee Chief nominates BIA regional leader for tribe's Secretary of
> State
> http://nativetimes.com/news/tribal/6450-cherokee-chief-nominates-bia-regional-leader-for-tribes-secretary-of-state
>
>
> First Nations: A 2011 Retrospective of the Year’s News
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/31/first-nations-a-2011-retrospective-of-the-years-news-70181
>
>
> First masters degree for "Helping One Another" Tribal Spec. Ed.
> http://thecirclenews.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=613&Itemid=63
>
>
> Tribe seeks easier access to Peyote plants
> http://nativetimes.com/life/culture/6569-tribe-seeks-easier-access-to-peyote-plants
>
>
> ‘Most Teachers Don’t Know Who First Nations Are’
> http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/29/most-teachers-dont-know-who-first-nations-are-69048
>
>
> The Berenstain Bears speak Lakota in special 20-episode series
> http://thecirclenews.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=593&Itemid=63
>
>
> Lakota Attitude
> http://www.lastrealindians.com/2011/12/31/lakota-attitude/
>
> Tribal officials object to historic garment sale
> http://nativetimes.com/life/culture/6507-tribal-officials-object-to-historic-garment-sale
>
>
> How Do You Prove You’re an Indian?
> http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/21/opinion/for-indian-tribes-blood-shouldnt-be-everything.html?_r=1
>
>
> Tribe’s logging drawing attention
> http://www.registerguard.com/web/newslocalnews/27359037-41/tribe-forest-coquille-management-blm.html.csp
>
>
>
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>
>
>
> Humor and other things (not necessarily Indian related):
> ---------------------------------------------------------
>
> From my Mother:
>
>
> Humor for older folks
>
> THE OLDER CROWD
> A distraught senior citizen
> Phoned her doctor's office.
> 'Is it true,' she wanted to know,
> 'that the medication
> You prescribed has to be taken
> For the rest of my life?'
> 'Yes, I'm afraid so,' the doctor told her.
> There was a moment of silence
> Before the senior lady replied,
> I'm wondering, then,
> Just how serious is my condition
> Because this prescription is marked
> 'NO REFILLS'.'
>
>
> An older gentleman was on the operating table awaiting surgery
> and he insisted that his son, a renowned surgeon, perform the
> operation. As he was about to get the anesthesia, he asked to
> speak to his son: 'Yes, Dad, what is it?' 'Don't be nervous, son;
> Do your best, And just remember, If it doesn't go well, If
> something happens to me, Your mother is going to come and live
> with you and your wife....'
>
>
>
> Aging:
> Eventually you will reach a point
> When you stop lying about your age
> And start bragging about it. This is so
> true. I love to hear them say "you don't look that old."
>
>
> The older we get,
> The fewer things
> Seem worth waiting in line for.
>
>
> Some people try to turn back their odometers. Not me!
> I want people to know 'why' I look this way.
> I've traveled a long way and some of the roads weren't paved.
>
>
>
> When you are dissatisfied
> And would like to go back to youth,
> Think of Algebra.
>
>
>
> Two guys one old one young
> Are pushing their carts around Wal-Mart
> When they collide.
> The old guy says to the young guy,
> 'Sorry about that. I'm looking for my wife,
> And I guess I wasn't paying attention
> To where I was going.
> The young guy says, 'That's OK, it's a coincidence.
> I'm looking for my wife, too...'
> I can't find her and I'm getting a little desperate'
> The old guy says, 'Well,
> Maybe I can help you find her....
> What does she look like?'
> 'The young guy says,
> 'Well, she is 27 yrs old, tall,
> With red hair,
> Blue eyes, is buxom,
> Long legs, And is wearing short shorts.
> What does your wife look like?'
> To which the old guy says, 'Doesn't matter,
> --- let's look for yours.'
>
> ==========
>
>
> From Ed Clark:
> --------------
>
>
> Woman and a Fork
>
>
> There was a young woman who had been diagnosed with a terminal
> illness and had been given three months to live. So as she was
> getting her things "in order," she contacted her Pastor and had
> him come to her house to discuss certain aspects of her final wishes.
>
> She told him which songs she wanted sung at the service, what
> scriptures she would like read, and what outfit she wanted to
> be buried in.
>
> Everything was in order and the Pastor was preparing to leave
> when the young woman suddenly remembered something very important
> to her.
>
> "There's one more thing," she said excitedly..
>
> "What's that?" came the Pastor's reply.
>
> "This is very important," the young woman continued. "I want to be
> buried with a fork in my right hand."
>
> The Pastor stood looking at the young woman, not knowing quite what to
> say.
>
> That surprises you, doesn't it?" the young woman asked.
>
> "Well, to be honest, I'm puzzled by the request," said the Pastor.
>
> The young woman explained. "My grandmother once told me this story,
> and from that time on I have always tried to pass along its message
> to those I love and those who are in need of encouragement.. In all
> my years of attending socials and dinners, I always remember that
> when the dishes of the main course were being cleared, someone would
> inevitably lean over and say, 'Keep your fork.' It was my favorite
> part because I knew that something better was coming.....like velvety
> chocolate cake or deep-dish apple pie. Something wonderful, and with
> substance!'
>
> So, I just want people to see me there in that casket with a fork
> in my hand and I want them to wonder "What's with the fork?" Then
> I want you to tell them: "Keep your fork,....." The best is yet to come"
>
>
> The Pastor's eyes welled up with tears of joy as he hugged the
> young woman good-bye. He knew this would be one of the last times
> he would see her before her death. But he also knew that the young
> woman had a better grasp of heaven than he did. She had a better
> grasp of what heaven would be like than many people twice her age,
> with twice as much experience and knowledge. She KNEW that something
> better was coming.
>
> At the funeral people were walking by the young woman's casket and
> they saw the cloak she was wearing and the fork placed in her right
> hand. Over and over, the Pastor heard the question, "What's with the
> fork?" And over and over he smiled.
>
> During his message, the Pastor told the people of the conversation he
> had with the young woman shortly before she died. He also told them
> about the fork and about what it symbolized to her. He told the people
> how he could not stop thinking about the fork and told them that they
> probably would not be able to stop thinking about it either.
>
>
>
>
>
> ========================
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> ========================
>
>
> History section:
>
> Here are some randomly picked historical events for January
> -------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> January 1, 1877: Colonel Nelson "Bear Coat" Miles, and his
> forces from Fort Keogh (near modern Miles City, in eastern
> Montana), are moving up the Tongue River in search of Crazy
> Horse, and his followers. They have their first skirmish with
> Indians. According to army reports, there are 600 lodges on
> the Tongue River, which are abandoned as Miles moves through
> the area.
>
> January 1, 1756: After the attack of the christianized Indian
> village of Gnadenhutten (near modern Leighton, Pennsylvania)
> on November 24, 1755, by other Indians, British troops were
> sent in to patrol the area. Two groups of Delaware, one led
> by Chief Tedyuscung, attacked the troops and farms in the area.
> Twenty soldiers and several settlers were killed, and the
> village was burned. The Monrovian missionaries abandoned the
> area. They and many of their Indian converts moved to Ohio
> and established another village named Gnadenhutten.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 2, 1848: Peter Skene Ogden arranges for the release of captives
> during the Cayuse attack on the Whitman Mission.
>
> January 2, 1824: The Treaty of Fort Moultrie was ratified
> by the U.S. Senate.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 3, 1895: On November 25, 1894, a group of nineteen
> Hopi "hostiles" were placed under arrest by the army for
> interfering with "friendly" Hopi Indian activities on their
> Arizona reservation. The nineteen prisoners are held in Alcatraz
> prison in California from January 3, 1895 to August 7, 1895.
>
> January 3, 1541: De Soto visited the main Chickasaw town. He
> wanted to visit Caluca, and he got guides and interpreters
> from the Chickasaw.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 4, 605: Palenque Maya Lord Ac - Kan ascends the throne
> according to the museum at Palenque
>
> Photo at: http://americanindian.net/mayae.html
>
> January 4, 1874: Eskiminzin of the Aravaipa Apache, survivor
> of the Camp Grant massacre and arrested as a “military precaution,”
> escaped from San Carlos with many of his band. He returned
> in four months because most of his people were sick and hungry.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 5, 1806: Sacajawea tells Lewis and Clark she wants to
> see a dead whale which has washed up on the beach in Oregon.
>
> January 5
> 1802: According to some sources, William Augustus Bowles,
> self-appointed “Director General and Commander-In-Chief of
> the Muskogee Nation,” led a force of Seminoles ( Miccosukees)
> warriors against the Spanish in St. Marks in northern Florida.
> They gave up their attack and siege in a little over a week.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 6, 1706: The Spanish are trying to improve relations
> with the Pueblos of modern New Mexico. Governor Francisco
> Cuervo y Valdez and "Protector General for the Indians"
> Captain Alfonso Rael de Aguilar meet with leaders of all the
> nearby tribes. Among the Indians is Don Domingo Romero Yuguaque.
> Yuguaque is Governor of the Tesuque Pueblo.
>
> January 6, 1864: To force the Navajos to move to the Bosque
> Redondo Encampment, the army got Kit Carson to mount an
> expedition against the Navajos in the Canyon de Chelly. Captain
> Albert Pfeiffer and a small force left Fort Canby to met
> Carson at the canyon. Carson was called Rope Thrower by the
> Indians.
>
> See photos of the area on my website at:
> http://americanindian.net/utah2008/canyonchelly/index.html
>
> http://americanindian.net/scan/Chelly/CanyondeChellyarea1980s/index.html
>
> --------
>
>
> January 7, 1781: The Mission San Pedro Y San Pablo De Bicuner
> is established, in modern Imperial County, California, where
> the Anza Trail crosses the Colorado River. This is on land
> claimed by the Quechan (Yuma) Indians.
>
> January 7, 1802: President Thomas Jefferson believed Indians
> had more land than they needed. He felt that if they became
> indebted at the government trade houses, they would sell
> their lands to pay the debts. He also voiced the opinion
> that if they became farmers they would need less land. Today,
> he addressed the Wea, Potawatomi, and Miami Indians on the
> latter issues. He extolled the virtues of renewable food and
> clothing supplies. “We will with pleasure furnish you with
> implements for the most necessary arts, and with persons
> who may instruct you how to make and use them.”
>
> --------
>
>
> January 8, 1700: Pierre le Moyne, Sieur d'Iberville,
> establishes a fort and trading post on the Mississippi River
> a few dozen miles south of present day New Orleans. It is his
> hope to establish friendly relations with the lower Mississippi
> valley Indians to keep them from allying with the English or
> the Spanish.
>
> January 8, 1779: Virginia Governor Patrick Henry ordered the
> Virginia militia to mount a campaign against the Chickamauga,
> an offshoot of the Cherokee Nation. Former Cherokee Chief
> Dragging Canoe and his followers had joined the Chickamauga.
> They continued to attack American settlements despite peace
> treaties signed by conservative Cherokee chiefs.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 9, 1790: Spanish and Indian forces under Commanding
> General Juan de Ugalde attack a group of 300 Lipan, Lipiyan,
> and Mescalero Apaches at what they called the Arroyo de la
> Soledad. The Spanish soundly defeat the Apache. The Spaniards
> name the battlegrounds the "Cañón de Ugalde" in honor of
> their commander. Modern Uvalde, Texas gets its name from
> this spot.
>
> January 9, 1843: All of Pascofa’s Apalachicola “Seminoles”
> (actually Creeks who had fled the Creek Wars and joined the
> Seminoles) surrendered to Colonel Ethan Hitchcock in St.
> Marks, Florida. This brought an end to this Seminole war.
> The group included a total of fifty people.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 10, 1839: John Benge, and 1,103 other Cherokees
> arrive in the Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma). They
> started their trek with 1,200.
>
> January 10, 1852: According to the Oklahoma Law Enforcement
> Memorial, Chin-Chi-Kee, Captain, Chickasaw Lighthorse,
> attempted to arrest four whiskey smugglers south of Tishomingo,
> the capital of the Chickasaw Nation. A fought broke out,
> and Chin-Chi-Kee, armed only with a knife, killed three of
> the men before the fourth, a Seminole Indian named Bill
> Nannubbee, shot him in the head and killed him.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 11, 1851: As a part of the "Mariposa Indian Wars" in California,
> Sheriff James Burney leads a force of settlers
> against the local Indians. The battle is a draw.
>
> January 11, 1698: Four French missionaries had been staying
> with the Quapaw Indians, on the Mississippi River. They
> traveled downstream and reached a Tunica Indian village.
> Missionary Antoine Davion decided to stay with the Tunica to
> preach to them.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 12, 1880: Major Albert Morrow, and elements of the
> Ninth Cavalry "buffalo soldiers," find, and attack Victorio,
> and his Warm Springs Apaches, near the source of the Puerco
> River, in southern New Mexico. The fighting lasts for about
> four hours, until sunset, when the Indians escape. One soldier
> is killed, and one scout is wounded.
>
> January 12, 1825: James Hudson had been found guilty of
> murdering Seneca subchief Logan in Madison County, Indiana.
> Hudson was part of a group of settlers who killed eight other
> Seneca and Miami Indians in the Fall Creek Massacre on
> March 22, 1824. Two of the other attackers would also be hung
> at a later date.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 13, 1729: Measels are spreading through "New Spain."
> It has struck the Pima workers at the mission San Ignacio de
> Caburica. The priest, Father Campos, baptizes twenty-two Pimas
> "in periculo mortis" because they are so close to death. This
> epidemic kills many Indians.
>
> January 13, 1756: For the next five days, Pennsylvania
> authorities and local Indians held a council in Carlisle,
> Pennsylvania. Governor Morris and several other prominent
> people represent the British. The Indians were represented
> by Aroas (Silver Heels), Belt of Wampum, Canachquasy, Isaac,
> Jagrea, Seneca George, and several others. These discussions
> led to the eventual declaration of war against the Delaware
> and the Shawnee by the British later in the year.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 14, 1971: An election which adopted of a Constitution
> and Bylaws for the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana is ratified
> by the Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Harrison Loesch.
> The election is held on November 7, 1970.
>
> January 14, 1830: The U.S. Senate passed a resolution that
> called for the government to survey lands west of the Mississippi
> and then “parcel out among the Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw and
> Chickasaw tribes of Indians Its intent was for the Indians
> to move there en masse.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 15, 1832: The Chickasaw meet at their council house
> to discuss the removal proposal of President Jackson. They
> decide to approve the removal, but they will not cooperate
> with any efforts to have them share lands with the Choctaws.
>
> January 15, 1704: On December 14, 1703, fifty South Carolina
> militia under Governor James Moore, allied with 1,000 Creek
> warriors, captured the Spanish Mission of Ayubale in northern
> Florida. The Spanish governor of Florida, Juan Ruiz Mexia,
> launches an expedition of Spanish soldiers and Apalachee
> Indians to recaptured the mission. In the subsequent battle,
> the Carolina-Creek forces were victorious.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 16, 1805: The Mandans parlay with the Minnetarrees
> according to Lewis and Clark.
>
>
> January 16, 1847: The Treaty of Cahuenga was signed, ceding
> California to the United States.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 17, 1800: Congress passes "An Act for the Preservation
> of Peace with the Indian Tribes." One of its provisions was:
> "That if any citizen or other person residing within the
> United States, or the territory thereof, shall send any talk,
> speech, message or letter to any Indian nation, tribe, or
> chief, with an intent to produce a contravention or infraction
> of any treaty or other law of the United States, or to disturb
> the peace and tranquility of the United States, he shall
> forfeit a sum not exceeding two thousand dollars, and be
> imprisoned not exceeding two years."
>
> January 17, 1850: Cupeno Chief Antonio Garra had attacked the
> settlements at Warner Hot Springs in modern San Diego County,
> California. This and other similar attacks were in retaliation
> for the forced indentured servitude of many Indians. Garra
> was captured by a citizens militia. They executed him.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 18, 1870: From a marker in the Fort Buford (North
> Dakota) cemetery: "He That Kills His Enemies - Indian Scout-
> January 18, 1870 - Died of Wounds ... in a quarrel with a
> fellow scout on the 5th inst. received a penetrating (arrow)
> wound of the pelvis and abdomen. ... Death occurred January
> 18, 1870. An autopsy could not be obtained owing to the
> feelings of the relatives."
>
> My photos of the area:
> http://americanindian.net/2003u.html
>
>
> January 18, 1958: The Lumbee broke up a Ku Klux Klan meeting
> in North Carolina and made national headlines.
>
>
> --------
>
>
> January 19, 1777: A group of Oneida chiefs meet with Colonel
> Elmore at Fort Schuyler. They want the army to tell the
> Mohawks that the great council fire of the Onondagas as been
> extinguished.
>
> January 19, 1847: In Don Fernandez de Taos (present-day Taos,
> New Mexico), recently installed Governor George Bent was trying
> to keep Mexican and Pueblo Indians from revolting (an earlier
> revolt was prevented). A number of Pueblo Indians demanded
> the release of some Indians being held in jail. Words were
> exchanged, and a fight started. People were killed on both
> sides. Governor Bent was attacked, killed, and scalped. The
> Indians’ plan was to kill all of the Americans they could find.
> Near Mora, eight Americans were captured, robbed, and shot.
> Many Mexicans joined the revolt against the Americans who
> had captured Santa Fe de San Francisco (present-day Santa Fe,
> New Mexico) on August 18, 1846.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 20, 1830: Red Jacket (Sagoyewatha) is a Seneca Chief
> born around 1779. While he is often called a coward in war,
> he is respected as a great speaker, and for his refusal to
> adopt white ways. Following the way of many before him, he
> eventually becomes an alcoholic. He dies today.
>
> January 20, 1891: King Kalakaua died.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 21, 1731: Natchez Indians, led by Chief Farine, have
> built a fort in Louisiana near the Red River. French and
> Tunica forces, led by the governor of Louisiana Etienne de
> Perier, attack the fort. The fighting lasts for three days.
> While the Natchez kill many of the allied forces, they are
> at a disadvantage because the French have a cannon. After
> three days of fighting, the Natchez promise to surrender
> the next morning. Many of the Natchez escape during the night,
> including Chief Farine.
>
> January 21, 1674: Father Pierre Millet “foretold” the coming
> of today’s lunar eclipse, using an almanac. He challenged
> Iroquois shaman to predict the time or date of the eclipse,
> which they did not. Millet makes religious inroads among the
> Iroquois by his successful prediction.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 22, 1855: The Treaty of Point Elliot (12 Stat. 927)
> is signed. The Tulalip, the Kalapuya, the Swinomish, and the
> Snoqualnoo Tribe of Whidbey Island, Washington are among
> the signers.
>
> January 22, 1599: On December 4, 1598, a fight broke out
> between Acoma Pueblo and Spaniards under Juan de Zaldivar
> when a soldier stole some turkeys. In retaliation, de Zaldiver’s
> brother Vicente returned with seventy soldiers. After two
> days of fighting, the Acoma surrender, and 500 were taken
> prisoner. Seventy Acoma were tried by Juan de Oñate Zaldivar’s
> uncle. All seventy were found guilty on February 12, 1599.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 23, 1689: Saco, in southwestern Maine is attacked
> by Abenaki Indians, one in a series of attacks on the
> settlement. Nine settlers are killed in the fighting.
>
> January 23, 1812: When Tecumseh visited the Creeks, he told
> them to wait for a sign that would tell them it was time to
> begin their uprising against the Europeans. Tecumseh said he
> would stamp the ground and make every house in Tuckabatchee
> fall down. The Creek Nation was shaken by an earthquake.
> Many of the younger braves felt this was the awaited sign.
> They were cautioned by calmer heads to wait for a less
> ambiguous event.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 24, 1835: The Mexican Governor Figueroa in Monterey,
> California writes a letter to the Alcalde of San José. He
> warns the local ranchers not to mount punitive expeditions
> against the local Indians. Some Indians have been raiding
> ranches to steal the horses. One more than one occasion,
> the Mexicans have killed innocent Tulare Indians in their
> efforts to punish the thieves.
>
> January 24, 1814: Andrew Jackson’s force of American soldiers
> and Indian allies hoped to spring a trap on the Red Stick
> Creeks, led by William Weatherford. As Jackson’s forces
> started to cross Enitachopco Creek in Alabama, they encountered
> the Red Stick Creeks. Jackson’s initial feint was unsuccessful
> because his troops did not hold their ground. After assuming
> personal command of the battle, Jackson rallied his troops
> and inflicted considerable losses on the Red Stick Creeks.
> The Creeks lost 189 warriors during this battle and the Battle
> of Emuckfau two days earlier. Jackson’s force sustained twenty
> fatalities.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 25, 1968: The United States Indian Claims Commission,
> decrees that the Mescalero Apaches of New Mexico should
> receive $8,500,000 for lands taken from them in the 1800s.
> The Mescaleros refuse the largesse because, by law, they
> cannot share the money with the Lipan, and Chiricahua Apaches.
> A future ruling allows this.
>
> January 25, 1692: Just before dawn, the village of York, Maine,
> was attacked by 150 Abenaki warriors led by Chief Madockawando.
> The Abenaki killed more than four dozen settlers, and almost
> eight were taken as prisoners, then sold or used as slaves.
> The village and surrounding farms were burned for miles.
> (This battle also recorded as happening on February 5.)
>
> --------
>
>
> January 26, 1716: Cherokee Chief Caesar has told the English
> in South Carolina that he will never fight them. He also
> tells the Europeans they have nothing to fear from the Creeks,
> because they want peace, too. He offers to arrange for
> leading Creeks to go to Charles Town to arrange a peace.
> Today, sixteen Creek and Yamassee representatives arrive
> at the Cherokee village of Tugaloo in northeastern Georgia.
> The Creeks and the Yamassee know of the Cherokee's desire
> to remain neutral, or at peace. Rather than talking about
> peace, the representatives urge the Cherokees to join them
> in their plan to attack the South Carolina settlements. This
> so angers the Cherokees that the representatives are killed.
>
> January 26, 1836: The Battle of Hitchity takes place in Stewart
> County, Georgia. Creek warriors on the Chattahoochee River
> were attacked by the local militia.
>
>
> --------
>
> January 27, 1863: General Patrick Connor, and almost 300
> California volunteers fight Bear Hunter's Northern Shoshone
> on Bear River, north of the Idaho-Utah boundary. The
> soldiers report 224 of the warriors are killed in the
> fighting, including Bear Hunter. Other sources put the
> number nearer to 400, including many women and children.
> Connor is called "Star Chief" by the Indians. This is
> called the "Battle of Bear River" by the army. Others
> call it "The Bear River Massacre." Most sources says this
> happens on January 29, 1863.
>
> January 27, 1933: In an auspicious event for Cherokee history,
> Lila Beatrice Adair is born.
>
> Happy Birthday, Mom!
>
>
> --------
>
> January 28, 1908: As listed in Executive Order Number 744,
> the lands set aside for the Navajo Indians in New Mexico
> conflict with the lands set aside for the Jicarilla Apaches
> by Executive Order on November 11, 1907. This will be
> corrected.
>
> January 28, 1833: A Cherokee commission of John Ross, John
> Baldridge, Richard Taylor, and Joseph Vann address the
> secretary of war in Washington, D.C. They again state their
> unwillingness to negotiate with the federal government about
> removal while the federal government was not living up to
> its previous agreements to protect them from the illegal
> actions of the state of Georgia. The Cherokees were told
> their only hope was for removal. During subsequent discussions,
> President Jackson offered the Eastern Cherokees $3 million
> for all lands east of the Mississippi River, excluding
> North Carolina. John Ross asked the president how he would
> be able to protect the Cherokees in Indian Territory
> (present-day Oklahoma) if he cannot protect them from Georgia.
> The commission felt the gold mines on Cherokee lands were
> worth more than the president’s offer.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 29, 1881: The Eight lodges of Iron Dog and
> sixty-three of his followers surrender to Major George
> Ilges' forces near the Poplar River in Montana. Thirteen
> horses, and five guns are seized by the troops. The
> weather remains bitterly cold.
>
> January 29, 1675: John Sassamon was found under the ice of
> Assawompsett Pond, fifteen miles from the Plymouth. A
> Christian Indian educated at Harvard, Sassamon recently
> left living with the whites to become King Philip’s aide.
> He then left Philip and returned to the colony as a preacher
> for the local Indians. He told the colony of Philip’s
> plans to attack, but he would not be believed. After his
> body was found, witnesses testified in court that three
> Wampanoag murdered Sassamon. Some time later, one of the
> three confessed on the gallows, after his rope broke while
> being hanged. He was hanged anyway. This episode was the
> spark Philip needed for his war.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 30, 1838: Seminole Chief Osceola dies at Fort
> Moultrie, in Charleston, South Carolina. It is believe he
> has some sort of throat disease, others say malaria, other
> say he dies of a broken heart.
>
> January 30, 1712: Near New Bern, North Carolina, Tuscarora
> and Coree Indians had built a fort they called Narhantes.
> As a part of the Tuscarora War, several hundred Indians
> and a few dozen South Carolina settlers, led by Colonel
> John Barnwell, attacked the fort. The defenders suffered
> sixty-two fatalities, including ten women. The attackers
> lost six Indians and seven Europeans. Sixty of the attackers
> were wounded in the fighting, which lasted a little less
> than an hour.
>
> --------
>
>
> January 31, 1833: The Mi’kmaq Waycobah First Nation reserve
> of Whycocomagh #2 is established in Nova Scotia, according
> to the Nova Scotia Councils.
>
> January 31, 1699: The French expedition under Pierre le Moyne,
> Sieur d’Iberville, landed on Dauphin Island, Alabama. The
> expedition eventually moved inland. Dauphin Island temporarily
> served as the French capital on the Gulf Coast.
>
>
> ========================
> X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X
> ========================
>
>
>
> That's it for now.
>
> Stay safe,
>
> Phil Konstantin
> http://americanindian.net
>
>
> ============================================================
> End of Phil Konstantin's January 2011 Newsletter
> ============================================================
> .
> .
> .
> .
> .

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Four of the five books I have worked on. I either wrote, co-wrote, or contributed to each of these beeks

This is the cover to my first book. 
Click here to got more info, or to order a copy. Click on the cover to order a copy or to get more info.
This Day in North American Indian History
This Day in North American Indian History is a one-of-a-kind, vastly entertaining and informative book covering over 5000 years of North American Indian history, culture, and lore. Wide-ranging, it covers over 4,000 important events involving the native peoples of North America in a unique day-by-day format.

The thousands of entries in This Day in North American Indian History weave a compelling and comprehensive mosaic of North American Indian history spanning more than five millennia-every entry an exciting opening into the fascinating but little- known history of American Indians.

Over 100 photographs and illustrations - This book has 480 pages, weighs 2.2 pounds and is 8" by 9.5" in size. The Dates, Names and "Moons" section of these pages are based on the book.

This is the cover to my 4th book. 
Click here to got more info, or to order a copy or to get more info.
This is the cover to my 4th book. Click here to got more info, or to order a copy or to get more info."


Native American History For Dummies

I wrote six of the twenty-four chapters in this book. I am credited with being the technical editor. Book Description:
Native American History For Dummies introduces readers to the thousand-year-plus history of the first inhabitants of North America and explains their influence on the European settlement of the continent. Covering the history and customs of the scores of tribes that once populated the land, this friendly guide features vivid studies of the lives of such icons as Pocahontas, Sitting Bull, and Sacagawea; discusses warfare and famous battles, offering new perspectives from both battle lines; and includes new archaeological and forensic evidence, as well as oral histories that show events from the perspective of these indigenous peoples. The authors worked in concert with Native American authorities, institutions, and historical experts to provide a wide range of insight and information.
This is the cover to my 3rd book. 
Click here to got more info, or to order a copy or to get more info.
This is the cover to my 3rd book. Click here to got more info, or to order a copy or to get more info
Treaties With American Indians I wrote an article and several appendix items for this book.
Clips from a review on Amazon.com: *Starred Review* In the 93 years from 1778 until 1871, there were more than 400 treaties negotiated by Indian agents and government officials. Editor Fixico and more than 150 contributors have crafted a three volume comprehensive tool that will soon become essential for anyone interested in the topic. A resource section with lists of ?Alternate Tribal Names and Spellings,? ?Tribal Name Meanings,? (<---- I wrote this part) Treaties by Tribe,? and ?Common Treaty Names? and a bibliography and comprehensive index are repeated in each volume. This impressive set has a place in any academic library that supports a Native American studies or American history curriculum. It is the most comprehensive source of information on Canadian-Indian treaties and U.S.-Indian treaties. Also available as an e-book.

"The Wacky World of Laws"
It was just released in May 2009.
The Wacky World of Laws. Click on the cover to order a copy or to get more info.

The Wacky World of Laws is a compilation of U.S. and International Laws that are out of the ordinary. With the U.S. churning out 500,000 new laws every year and 2 million regulations annually, this book is the ideal go-to book fro everyone who wants a good laugh at the expense of our legal system. Law so often can be boring! Now with The Wacky World of Laws, you can be the hit of any water cooler conversation, and amaze your friends with precious legal nuggets.

I wrote most of this book. It is my fifth book.


(copyright, © Phil Konstantin, 1996-2013)






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