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Page 219
Interview with George Herendeen1
For the most part the statements which I here make are taken from very full notes of the Little Big Horn expedition made in 1877 when all of the details were fresh in my mind. I am not, therefore, depending on memory for more than these thirty three years. Herendeen 64 years old in 1909.
With 149 civilians crossed Yellowstone March 24, 1874, at mouth Porcupine Creek and started for Rosebud and had fight at big bend of
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1. Walter Camp field notes, folder 98, BYU Library. George Herendeen was born on November 28, 1846, in Parkman Township, Geauga County, Ohio. After service during the Civil War he went west and was in Denver, Colorado, in 1868. He probably worked as a cowboy in New Mexico and then followed the cattle trails into Montana about 1869. In 1874 he was with the Yellowstone Wagonroad and Prospecting Expedition, and in 1875 he helped Fellows Pease build the Fort Pease stockade on the north bank of the Yellowstone River near the mouth of the Bighorn River. He joined Custer's column on June 22 and was in the valley and hilltop fights. He was engaged in the Nez Perce campaign in 1877. In later years he resided in Bozeman, Lewistown, and Great Falls and moved to Harlem, Montana, in 1889, where he was employed on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation under W. R. Logan. He died on June 17, 1918, and was buried in Harlem Cemetery. More biographical information is found in Barry Johnson's "George Herendeen, Montana Scout," The English Westerners' Brand Book (London: The English Westerners Society), 2:3, April 1960, and 2:4, July 1960. "Custer VindicatedA Scout's Story of the Battle of the Little Big Horn"was published in the New York Times and New York Herald, January 22, 1878, and reprinted in William A. Graham's The Custer Myth (Harrisburg, Pa.: The Stackpole Co., 1953), pp. 26165. A copy of a letter from Herendeen to his wife, dated January 4, 1878, concerning details of the Little Bighorn River fight is in the Library of Congress. A statement dated July 1, 1876, by Herendeen concerning the fight was published in The Army and Navy Journal, July 15, 1876. "Herendeen's Story" sent by telegraph from Bismarck July 7, 1876, was published in the New York Times on July 8, 1876. Page four
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