< previous page page_201 next page >

Page 201
Interview with Turtle Rib, September 22, 1908; Valentine, Nebraska1
Now 60 years old, a member of Minneconjou Sioux. He fought under Lamedeer. He was not in the battle with Crook. They came into the village from the direction of the Rosebud, arriving on the day before the battle. The soldiers were following their trail. Three days before this their men had engaged a considerable band of Crows. The village was arranged in camps of the different tribes in the following order, down the river: Uncapapa, Blackfeet (under Black Moon), Minneconjou, Sans Arc, Ogalalla, Northern Cheyenne, Brule (these last two should probably be reversed).
The fighting (Reno) started against the camp of the Uncapapas. He (Turtle Rib) was asleep when the soldiers were first reported in the valley but got in before the fighting stopped and killed one of the Rees. He saw other Rees getting away with a drove of Sioux ponies. The fighting against Reno did not last long. He could not say how many minutes, but only a few.
He did not see the fighting at Ford B, but when he passed back through the village to go against the soldiers on the high ground across the river (Custer) the women were stampeded and the children were crying. They said soldiers had come over the hill from the east and had been driven back. When he got up with the soldiers, there was a running fight with some of the soldiers on foot. Those who kept their horses seemed to be stampeded. Some were going toward the monument, and some were trying to ride back the way they came. Those on foot seemed to be the coolest and fought the hardest. No stand was made except at the end of the long ridge (where Custer fell), and here the bay and gray horses were all mixed together. There was a big dust, and the Indians were running all around the locality much excited
a375311f9e01788c54902d54146f9237.gif a375311f9e01788c54902d54146f9237.gif
1. Walter Camp field notes, folder 105, BYU Library.

 
< previous page page_201 next page >