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Page 135
Interview with George W. Glenn, January 22, 19141
Says Isaiah did not start with the command at Ft. Lincoln, but overtook it on the Rosebud with a message. Said he (Isaiah) had orders to go back, but Custer said, "No, you remain with me." Glenn says Isaiah's body was badly mutilated by the Indians.
John Smith, post trader at Ft. Lincoln, went as far as Heart River when the expedition started. He set up his sutler's tent when the men were paid and returned at the same time the Mrs. Custer went back.
At the mouth of the Rosebud we were camped below the boat and above the timber, on clear ground. Bob Jackson was sent back from the mouth of the Rosebud. I am sure I saw him there in that camp, but do not recall seeing him after that. When we left the Yellowstone each soldier carried on his horse twelve pounds of oats, eighty rounds of ammunition, and two horseshoes, one front and one hind shoe. We overloaded ourselves with ammunition to relieve the pack mules.
Many of the men left at the Powder River camp were fellows who played up sick. The officers inquired of the sergeants who were not able to go and such as were thought not to be well and rugged enough were left behind. In each company there was a detail, but there were others who did not want to go, and they pretended to be unwell. In Company H there were none of these, and that is why so few of our company were left there.
Jones was killed on the hill by a bullet that passed through several
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1. Walter Camp field notes, folder 109, BYU Library. George W. Glenn was born in Boston. His third enlistment was on September 3, 1875, under the name of George W. Glease. He deserted on October 15, 1877, and was apprehended on April 26, 1880. He was dishonorably discharged on July 31, 1880, at Fort Meade, Dakota. He later resided in a soldiers' home in Virginia.

 
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